A3Writer: Interactive Fiction
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Monday, September 3, 2012

Interactive Fiction

     I've been experimenting with interactive fiction, the earliest pioneer of the computer game that used text, and runs, as Sheldon Cooper put it, "on the world's most powerful graphics chip: imagination."
      I'm glad to discover that interactive fiction never died out. There is quite the thriving community behind it. Their resources have made it very easy to repatriate to this oft-forgotten medium. I've been interested in using IF (as they abbreviate it) for teaching purposes, but now I have to consider the future of the publishing industry.
      The iPad has kind of kickstarted a revolution in reading by integrating media files and links into their books for a richer experience, and the old Choose Your Own Adventure style books are making a comeback through digital means. However, interactive fiction is finding its way to devices as well with interpreters that can run on any platform, including ereaders like Kindle. Interactive fiction is perfect for such a platform. The e-ink screens don't need to display complicated, moving graphics, and a keyboard (either a touch-enabled or physical keyboard) for input makes interaction simple.
      I'm really excited to think that interactive fiction could make a resurgence, where games emphasize story and imagination over raw graphics processing and special effects.
      Those wanting to know more about interactive fiction can check out the Interactive Fiction Archive and Inform 7.

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