A3Writer: Methodology
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Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Methodology

            I’ve been very careful in my methodology. I wanted to teach for a long time in my college career, so I paid attention to my own professors’ methodologies. I paid attention to when I learned most and best. It wasn’t about the volume of information, but the depth of information an involvement with the subject. I had professors who, because of how they taught, were able to spark my interest in subjects I had previously detested. To this day I still regard Victorian literature as somewhat wrong, but I will at least judge each piece on its own merits, and I have come to love the essayists of that period.

            So when I began teaching, I folded all of the methodologies I liked together and rejected the ones that drove me away from subjects. Now, certainly, I know that there are people who will not (and did not for my professors, either) enjoy this methodology, but that’s the way it should be.

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