A3Writer: Feedback
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Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Feedback


            I’m a big believer in feedback. My students are never at a lack of feedback in their writing. I believe in lots of practice for analytical writing, and on all of these assignments (which many students complain there are too many) I provide lots of ink for their consideration. Of necessity, there is more critical (not negative) feedback than positive. I do mark where I think they’ve done well, but what they truly need is to know where they need to make improvements.
            I just wish more of them would actually use the feedback. Many, many students when they receive an assignment back, skip straight to the grade, never to look back over my other comments.
It’s a frustrating state of affairs, and I wonder, quite often, why I bother with so much work when it’s unappreciated.
And then I wonder if there’s a better way. Is there a way to get students to look and acknowledge the feedback as opposed to the grade? Is there a way to make my grading quicker without compromising the level of feedback I give them?
I’m still searching.

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