A3Writer: Initiative
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Monday, April 8, 2013

Initiative


            I come from a long history of RPG games such as D&D, so when I think initiative, I automatically think of rolling dice. It’s important to win initiative because you get to set the pace. You get to be in control of the situation. You act instead of react.
            Along with the loss of creativity, which I posted about last week, there’s a lack of initiative in students (and writers). The norm is to let someone else take over and guide the situation.
            I think these are related. When creativity diminishes, there’s an increased desire to let someone else take the initiative, to guide what’s going on. Often this is relegated to instructors who are bombarded by messages of “I don’t know what to write.” In order to get students to produce anything, we often have to take students by the hand and move them forward.
            I hate doing that as I know with increasing instructions, with more and more guidelines, creativity becomes limited. It’s impossible to have highly detailed instructions without curtailing creativity in some way.
            I think I need to tackle the creativity problem in order to get rid of the hand-holding.

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