A3Writer: An Instructor Who Cares
Abraham (11) Aphrodite (3) Apocalypse (6) Apollo (4) Artemis (5) Athena (3) Bard (1) Ben Slater (13) Bible (33) Celtic (2) Character File (2) Chinese (1) Christian (1) Conferences (29) creation myths (15) Criminalelement (11) Dark Winds (22) Demeter (10) Don Iverson (4) Eden (5) Enchanter (16) essay (9) F3 (336) Fairy Tales (14) Family (2) Flood Myth (8) Flynn (62) Greek (37) Guest (1) Hades (10) Hindu (2) History Prof (20) Holiday (12) Holiday Myths (6) Incan (1) Iranian (2) Japanese (1) Job (21) Knowledge Myths (3) Library (8) Life (121) Love Gods (4) M3 (129) map (13) Matt Allen (98) Metamyth (5) Misc Flash (36) monthly chart (21) Movies (6) Myth Law (2) Myth Media (4) NaNoWriMo (20) Noah (5) noir (9) Norse (10) Odyssey (1) Persephone (13) Persian (1) Poseidon (1) Prometheus (5) publishing (24) ramble (111) Review (1) Sam Faraday (22) Sci Fi (15) science (1) Serial (15) short story (14) Spotlight (8) Storm Riders (45) Teaching (136) Tech (18) Transformation (5) Travel (27) TV (10) TV Myth (1) Underworld (6) Vacation (15) vampires (18) W3 (11) Writing (166) Writing Tools (15) Zeus (7)

Monday, July 7, 2014

An Instructor Who Cares

            This is something tossed about a lot, but I think that teachers and students have very different definitions of what it means.
            Student’s perspective: Teacher is available outside of class. Teacher answers all of my questions whenever I ask them. Teacher gives me good grades. Teacher praises all my efforts. Teacher makes allowances for things in my life (work, family, other classes).
            Teacher’s perspective. Teacher is available outside of class within reason (teachers do have lives outside of teaching and have to deal with other work, other classes, and family just like students). Teacher answers questions that are reasonable (many questions are answered in class and by the syllabus, so there’s no need to repeat ourselves). Teachers praise efforts that are worth praising. Other efforts receive constructive criticism in order to encourage improvement. Teacher makes reasonable allowances. Everyone has a life with ups and downs, and it’s not fair to everyone if some people can get away with not attending class or turning in assignments late (and teachers are those who also have other things in life).
            I think this fundamental disparity, and the increasing number of students who insist on their way, is having a detrimental effect on teaching as a profession.
            And I have no idea on how to fix it.

            I’m not sure I want to try.

No comments: