A3Writer: Unconventional Methods
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Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Unconventional Methods

            I’m trying something a little new with my teaching this semester, which should not come as any surprise. Last semester, I was able to make a connection with my students in a way that I hadn’t previously. It came from not talking about the course material.
            I remember the day clearly, where I got into a conversation with students before class began, talking about education in general and their concerns about college, job, and life.
            The beginning of class came and went, and I let the conversation continue. I let it go for another forty-five minutes. The results were interesting, if not spectacular. From that time on, I could feel the class gel even more, and they appeared more interested in what each other had to say, and what I had to say.
            So I’m trying to make more room in my curriculum and teaching to allow for discussions and topics important and relevant to them. And in trademark fashion I believe I can bend the topic back around to that of the class, showing them why class material is important to them.



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