A3Writer: M³ Close Still Counts
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Monday, November 11, 2019

M³ Close Still Counts


Okay, so the thunderbolt was deflected, but that’s okay. Like with horseshoes, hand grenades, and tactical nuclear weapons, close counts with thunderbolts. The thunderbolt travels through the ground and hits Anchises that way. It doesn’t kill him, but it weakens his legs to the point he can’t stand on his own any more. He has been struck lame, even worse than Hephaestus.

Aphrodite, though, is pregnant, and gives birth to Aeneas, who is famous enough to have his own epic after a minor role in Homer’s Iliad, and is named as one of the founders of Rome after the fall of Troy.
As we saw with Diomedes, Aphrodite is fond of Aeneas, intervening to save his life in the middle of the battlefield. However, after giving birth to him, she’s done with Anchises. We might think Aphrodite is shallow for doing this, but there’s every likelihood that Anchises cannot stand up in other ways, so he’s not much good for satisfying her lust.