A3Writer: Wrongs Darker than Death or Night: God is Evil
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Monday, April 5, 2010

Wrongs Darker than Death or Night: God is Evil

     Yeah, so I swiped it from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. It isn't even one of my favorite episodes, but the title is appropriate. This marks the debut of a feature here, in which I will elaborate on some trope, cliche, or trend that pops up in fiction, TV, movies, Pez Dispensers, etc, and why I won't be doing them. First up: God is Evil.
     Now, this has been prompted by a recent episode of Supernatural where (spoiler) it is revealed that God is tired and does not care. Now, this is not the first time I've seen this particular idea. Piers Anthony did a very good job (excessive, in fact) in exploring this idea with And Eternity. Anne Rice had something similar with Memnoch The Devil Some could even say that Nietzsche had the original idea, though anyone with an English degree (or minor) and has suffered through Paradise Lost would say that it was Milton first (though Milton didn't intend it [That's my story and I'm sticking to it. A debate on P. Lost is for another time]).
     Regardless of where it comes from, though, I'm sick of it. I really am tired of this idea. Why can no one who does some kind of supernatural/real world fantasy ever say that God is good? When did it become taboo for God to be a good guy? Why must mankind forever struggle not just against evil, but good? Is this a case of Douglas Adams where we need to prove God doesn't exist in order to progress? Is it to show the ability of mankind to carry on in the face of overwhelming odds? Is it just because God and religion are ill-favored right now? I don't know, really. I wish I did. There's even video games such as Bayonetta where the Wiccan vamp (make a note, not vampire, vamp) kicks angel butt with guns strapped to her shoes (that's another post altogether, as I can't help wondering why those guns do not jam with debris). On the flip-side we have vampires and other supernatural entities portrayed as good, cursed, underdogs deserving of sympathy. They are the underdogs, and we like the underdogs. But, why can't the forces of good be the underdog instead of the forces of evil? (Yes, I am aware that there are several good examples of vampires and others legitimately struggling with their "curse", but even that has become a cliche. In fact, it's so cliche that it's becoming the norm, and such entities behaving as originally conceived is considered aberrant.) The answer, they can, and I, for one, and a few others, am going to hold the line. In one of my earlier posts I tackle the subject of vampires, and I intend to hold the line on them, as well. I believe I've done good work in re-establishing the vampire as something truly powerful, and taken that a step further with "The Longest Night". I have plans to put forward some more of the "good guys" as well.
     Why am I so irked? I think because of the hypocrisy, by and large. Take Supernatural. Two men who use scripture, holy water, and religious ritual to banish evil, yet the two protagonists do not believe in God or angels?! This would be one of my moments for an inappropriate texting abbreviation so in vogue, yet I resist (Hint: it has three letters, and ends with a gerund). It really isn't that hard to connect the dots, people? Holy water, and religious symbols work against evil, therefore religion may not be a crock. Hmmmmmm.
     I suppose this has been bugging me for a while, which is one reason I made Matt into someone pretty pious (No pious Aeneas jokes, please). That and I was taking a cue from Bram that this stuff works. Medieval literature, myth, and folklore are all loaded with religion and its effect on the supernatural, especially demons, so why wouldn't it be put into use by someone who believes in the supernatural?
     Now, that's not to say I don't recognize the other side of things. In fact, I'm working on a story with a group of people (all set in the same "world" as Matt) have a different take on things, which should prove rather humorous when the twain shall meet.
     Hmmm, wandered a bit afield, and ranted far too long on this subject. Well, needless to say, at least in my works, God is good, and I'm not going to have Him switching sides. Keep on the look out for more Wrongs as this will become a regular feature (as much as I'm capable of regular posts).

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