A3Writer: Language Logic
1001 Nights (4) Abraham (11) Aphrodite (3) Apocalypse (6) Apollo (4) Arabian (4) Artemis (5) Athena (3) Bard (1) Ben Slater (13) Bible (43) Celtic (2) Character File (2) Chinese (1) Christian (1) Conferences (29) creation myths (15) Criminalelement (11) Dark Winds (22) Demeter (10) Don Iverson (4) Eden (5) Enchanter (16) essay (9) F3 (360) (1) Fairy Tales (14) Family (2) Flood Myth (8) Flynn (67) Greek (50) Guest (1) Hades (10) Hercules (6) Hindu (2) History Prof (22) Holiday (12) Holiday Myths (6) Incan (1) Iranian (2) Japanese (1) Job (21) Knowledge Myths (3) Library (8) Life (121) Love Gods (4) M3 (152) map (13) Matt Allen (109) Metamyth (5) Misc Flash (36) monthly chart (21) Movies (6) Myth Law (2) Myth Media (4) NaNoWriMo (20) Noah (5) noir (9) Norse (10) Odyssey (7) Persephone (13) Persian (1) Poseidon (1) Prometheus (5) publishing (24) ramble (111) Review (1) Sam Faraday (26) Samson (10) Sci Fi (15) science (1) Serial (24) short story (14) Spotlight (8) Storm Riders (48) Teaching (136) Tech (18) Transformation (5) Travel (27) TV (10) TV Myth (1) Underworld (6) Vacation (15) vampires (18) W3 (11) Writing (166) Writing Tools (15) Zeus (7)

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Language Logic

     I'm not a computer programmer, but I dabble.
     I dabbled with Excel, and became an Excel wizard. I dabble in Google Scripts. I'm starting to get it. I'm dabbling with interactive fiction, and even it has it's own little method. I've been struggling to figure out how it works, and after a week of intensive, independent study, I think I've finally got the method down of how it works.
      Which is when it hits me.
      Writing in a language is more about understanding the logic and conventions than anything else. When you can actually understand the logic and conventions, you can think in the language, which is the beginning of mastery.
      Academic writing is its own language. The part of academic writing that students struggle with are the logic and conventions of this new language. None of the vocabulary is any different, but understanding the mind of academic writing takes time and practice.
      Now how to impart this to my students. . . ?

No comments: