A3Writer: M3 Prometheus: Pandora's Gifts
1001 Nights (4) Abraham (11) Aphrodite (3) Apocalypse (6) Apollo (4) Arabian (4) Artemis (5) Athena (3) Bard (1) Ben Slater (13) Bible (43) Celtic (2) Character File (2) Chinese (1) Christian (1) Conferences (29) creation myths (15) Criminalelement (11) Dark Winds (22) Demeter (10) Don Iverson (4) Eden (5) Enchanter (16) essay (9) F3 (359) (1) Fairy Tales (14) Family (2) Flood Myth (8) Flynn (67) Greek (50) Guest (1) Hades (10) Hercules (6) Hindu (2) History Prof (22) Holiday (12) Holiday Myths (6) Incan (1) Iranian (2) Japanese (1) Job (21) Knowledge Myths (3) Library (8) Life (121) Love Gods (4) M3 (152) map (13) Matt Allen (108) Metamyth (5) Misc Flash (36) monthly chart (21) Movies (6) Myth Law (2) Myth Media (4) NaNoWriMo (20) Noah (5) noir (9) Norse (10) Odyssey (7) Persephone (13) Persian (1) Poseidon (1) Prometheus (5) publishing (24) ramble (111) Review (1) Sam Faraday (26) Samson (10) Sci Fi (15) science (1) Serial (23) short story (14) Spotlight (8) Storm Riders (48) Teaching (136) Tech (18) Transformation (5) Travel (27) TV (10) TV Myth (1) Underworld (6) Vacation (15) vampires (18) W3 (11) Writing (166) Writing Tools (15) Zeus (7)

Monday, January 19, 2015

M3 Prometheus: Pandora's Gifts

            Pandora often gets a bad reputation, similar to Eve in the Old Testament, but it’s really an undeserved reputation. To clear things up, we have to examine how she was made. Zeus asked for each of the gods to contribute a gift as part of her creation. In fact, the etymology of her name literally means “all-gifted” in Greek. So every god and goddess in Olympus contributed something to her make up, and not a flaw among them.
            So Pandora was never intended to be a curse on humanity—as she is often perceived. Instead, she is the best possible woman that could be made. The curiosity, often seen as the source of her trouble-making is actually a good thing. She’s supposed to be curious. Curiosity, to the Greeks was not just good, but divine. How else did the Greeks advance so much to the disciplines of science, philosophy, literature, and mathematics? They were curious. So Pandora’s curiosity is to be celebrated, not lamented. The very nature of her curiosity in opening the jar (not a box) is the best thing that could happen to mankind in Greek myth, and her other gifts helped mankind survive and thrive after its opening.

            But the jar comes later.

No comments: