A3Writer: M³ Mobsters of The Medieval World
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Monday, March 19, 2018

M³ Mobsters of The Medieval World

            Okay, so faeries. Notice the spelling. These are not fairies from fairy tales. This isn’t Tinkerbell, a fairy godmother, or anything like those stories. Thanks to modern storytelling and the marketing strategy of Jake and Will Grimm, those are happily-ever-after stories. Those fairies are nice.
            No, we’re talking about faeries, the Tuataha Dé Danann, with leprechauns, selkies, and  all manner of other folk who like to play tricks on human beings, especially if they can exploit greed, immorality, or other human weaknesses. Rumpelstiltskin? Faerie! Sometimes in the stories people get the better of them, other times, they don’t. It’s a crapshoot. The rules for faeries are simple. Don’t trust them, they play games, and they make lopsided bargains.
            I really do think that mobsters have faeries to thank for the idea of granting small favors and asking for big, life-long favors in return. Again, Rumpelstiltskin. She wanted straw into gold, he asks for her first-born son. How is that equitable? It ain’t.
            So when Arthur says he’ll do anything for Excalibur, we should slap a giant sticker to his forehead, reading “SUCKER!” This is not a bargain that can fundamentally end well for him. That’s not to say that he doesn’t get something amazing out of the bargain. Excalibur, especially the scabbard, is worth a high price, but Arthur should have been more careful in his dealings with the mob.