A3Writer: M³ Opportunity and Bondage
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Monday, May 21, 2018

M³ Opportunity and Bondage

            With Medusa’s head in tow, Perseus is nigh-invincible. He has some side adventures including accidentally killing his own father—Damn you Oracle of Delphi! But the big thing is when he’s flying around and he stumbles on a naked woman chained to a rock. Perseus, being male, is intrigued by this. But he does not fly down to rescue her. Instead, he tracks down the girl’s parents King Cepheus and queen Cassiopeia to get the story.

            Turns out that Cassiopeia did a no-no. A major no-no. She bragged about her daughter Andromeda’s beauty, claiming she was more beautiful than the Nereids, Poseidon’s attending nymphs.
            As punishment, Cassiopeia is stripped and sacrificed by being chained to a rock to be devoured by the Kraken. Wait, no, sorry. Got that wrong. That would be if there was justice instead of a desire for vengeance and suffering in the Greek myths. Let me fix it. All that stuff happened to Andromeda.
            So this young woman is about to be sacrificed through no crime of her own—not unlike Medusa. But while Athena’s only real option is to punish Medusa, Poseidon could easily make Cassiopeia, who is guilty of the crime, pay the penalty. Instead he wants people to suffer, and strikes out against the object of comparison (perhaps because Andromeda really is more beautiful, and she can’t be allowed to live, not unlike Arachne being better than Athena at weaving).
            But, never fear, Perseus is here!
            Once they settle on a good price. Even knowing the story, Perseus doesn’t go back to rescue Andromeda. Instead, he settles in at the negotiation table. His asking price, Andromeda’s hand in marriage.
            So what do we make of Perseus for this? Is he a shmuck? Is he treating women as property? What about him being a stand-up guy defending his mom? How do we reconcile these two behaviors? This is kind of a major stumbling point. He can’t be a good buy if this is how he treats women. His mom might be an exception. She his mom, after all, but he isn’t even getting Andromeda’s permission. You’d think that he could rescue her and at least take her on a date. Maybe he could at least talk to her and give her a cheesy pick-up line “Hey, baby, you get chained to this rock often?”
            No, she’s not even part of the conversation. She is negotiated for like property, which was often the case in the ancient world. Stay tuned next week as we dig into Perseus and Andromeda.