A3Writer: F3 Last Stand of the Indus
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Friday, December 14, 2012

F3 Last Stand of the Indus

The ship rocked under another explosion.
“Hull breach on deck three. Bulkheads are down and sealing it off.”
“Helm, bring us around in a tight turn.”
Flynn stood at the weapons console behind Captain Jacobie. He leaned in as the ship executed the turn. The kinetic struts flared to life on the ship’s status console. One of them flashed to red, then to black.

“Kinetic strut failure port forward,” Flynn reported. The strut went offline, then two other struts on the port side redlined. “Total failure of kinetic struts on imminent, sir. Hull is buckling. Port nacelle just detatched.”
“Steady on course, Use starboard engine to compensate for our spin and use the gravnet to take on the load of the struts.”
Flynn stopped. The captain has the same displays as I do. The ship can’t survive.
“Captain, please confirm.”
“You heard me, Lieutenant Commander.”
“Aye, sir. Rerouting functions, now.”
Flynn watched as the gravnet and starboard kinetic struts flashed into the red, but they seemed to be holding for now.
“Fire torpedoes,” the captain ordered.
“Torpedoes, aye.”
The torpedoes streaked away from the ship, but the stress on the launcher, which used a low gravnet to fire them, was too much for the power systems overall.
The gravnet in the torpedo room gave way, and because the entire grav system was being used to hold the ship together, they all collapsed.
“Structural collapse on deck twelve. Gravnet failure beginning shipwide. Kinetic struts are offline.”
“Give me a firing solution,” Jacobie ordered. “All hands, this is the captain, abandon ship.”
He should have given that ordered minutes ago.
“There’s nothing left, sir. All weapons are offline. We have to go.”
“Helm, program the ship for a ramming course, then execute the course change. Everyone else, get out of here.”
There’s no time for any of that. We need to leave, now.
Flynn ran for the hatch, and did his best to help other crew into pods.
“Captain, we have to go!”
“Not until the helm is—
The bridge rocked as systems blew out. The gravnet went out completely, so the tiny projectiles became deadly shrapnel that would keep ricocheting. Flynn clutched onto the bulkhead, and looked back on the bridge. The captain and helmsman were dead.
Flynn pulled himself out of the bridge and into the escape pod with the rest of the bridge crew, and jettisoned the pod. He had a good look as the Indus slowly felt to pieces. It didn’t even explode. The pieces of the ship simply drifted away.
Lifeless.

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