A3Writer: Teaching Rat Pack
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Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Teaching Rat Pack


            After reading this blog on the Washington Post I’m left wondering if inspiration from Bogey (honestly, is there a better source? No, I didn’t think so) can work here, too. As teachers, it’s too easy to point a finger at administrators, parents, and even at students. It’s too easy to pass the buck to the federal government with cries of “fix it”.
            The cries aren’t unjustified, as the scale is so big it takes federal intervention, but on the small side, in the classroom, can’t more be done. Can’t instructors envision a different way to go about the material? Yes, I full know that correcting students’ writing is time consuming. There are weeks where I can’t see the end to the essay grading, and I will go through an entire pen in two weeks. The amount of work feels much like the labor of Sisyphus.
            Going about it in a solitary manner isn’t the way, either. Surely there are packs of teachers (see where I’m going here?) that can come together across all disciplines to figure out something more that can be done. While an individual teacher may not be able to be heard, and it’s too unwieldy to band all together, can’t small groups push forward and keep Sisyphus’ rock from backsliding?

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