A3Writer: M³ Evolving Woman
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Monday, December 30, 2019

M³ Evolving Woman


Throughout the Greek pantheon, we’ve seen evidence of stagnation, of an inability to change. Yet we just looked at story of Aphrodite picking up the craft of weaving. Athena invented this craft, yet Aphrodite became skilled enough to make Athena want to renounce her claim to weaving altogether.

This is not just some idle part-time hobby, or maybe it is! We don’t’ know how much devotion Aphrodite gave to the craft, but her skill level and time put in are not the point, the fact that she can learn and learn well are.
Aphrodite exhibits that rare talent of being able to learn, to grow beyond what she was born as that, so far, only Zeus has exhibited. Clearly, characterizations as a simple goddess of love do not do her justice. It’s clear that if Aphrodite wants to do something, she can. None of the domains of the gods are safe from Aphrodite. She is not only able to learn the basics of some other domain, but master them.
Are there limits? It’s not clear. We have the weaving incident, and no others. Weaving is one of those crafts clearly relegated as “women’s work” in the Ancient world, so that could be the dividing line, but it’s all speculation without more evidence.
She learned, though. She grew to be more than the goddess of love, which is fantastic in a pantheon full of stagnation. It begs the question, is there anything beyond Aphrodite?