A3Writer: M³ Working Woman
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Monday, December 23, 2019

M³ Working Woman


One day, Aphrodite got curious and started weaving on a loom. Eventually, Athena caught her at this. We all know Athena is pretty possessive when it comes to weaving. She invented the craft and turned Arachne into a spider because of it. So we can expect something will happen here. We want it to be a Catfight of Epic Proportions™.

Nope.
Instead, Athena chucks it all. She is ready to give up being the goddess of weaving over this. While this kind of tantrum behavior shouldn’t really surprise us coming from a Greek god or goddess, it’s unusual that she would give up weaving without a fight.
Unless . . . she knows she would lose such a fight.
It’s not unheard of, especially since Arachne pulled it off. But this means that Aphrodite’s skill at weaving is not that of a beginner. In fact, we would probably have to conclude that it doesn’t just rival Athena, it blows her away. Why else would she give up something so precious to her without a fight?
Arachne proved that Athena takes pride in her weaving, and isn’t afraid to fight for it, so for her to simply pass the title over to Aphrodite without such a fight would mean she had to recognize the level of skill Aphrodite possessed, and it was better than her own.
We have no idea how long Aphrodite honed her craft, if it was days, weeks, centuries, whatever. But the fact that she attained a high enough proficiency that Athena will chuck it all is impressive.
Aphrodite, though, not wanting the title (responsibility?) apologized to Athena and renounced ever weaving again. So ends Aphrodite’s stint as a working woman.